Download Free Premium Joomla 3 Templates • FREE High-quality Joomla! Designs BIGtheme.net

Carla Deter Articles 1

2019 Texasweeklyonline.com. All Rights Reserved.

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Alleged kidnapping victim was crying with 'horrified' look when she was found

Array ( [post_title] => Alleged kidnapping victim was crying with 'horrified' look when she was found [post_content] =>

A 23-year-old woman allegedly held against her will was crying and had "a horrified look on her face" when police found her at her suspected kidnapper's Boston home, according to court documents.

Victor Pena, the 38-year-old charged in the kidnapping of Olivia Ambrose, was arrested after authorities say he was found at his Charlestown apartment Tuesday with Ambrose, who vanished Saturday night.

When the investigation into Ambrose's disappearance was intensifying, police followed the last known ping from her phone to an apartment complex. Detectives showed surveillance images to neighbors, who said the suspect looked like Pena, according to the documents obtained by ABC Boston affiliate WCVB.

The missing 23-year-old's phone also re-activated and she began sending messages to her mother, the documents said.

Maintenance staff was called in to open the door to Pena’s apartment on Tuesday, the documents said, and before drilling the lock, detectives waited about 20 minutes and knocked numerous times.

"Once the top lock was dismantled but prior to the lower locks being opened, the detectives heard the locks opening from the inside," the documents said.

Pena, who was at the doorway, "resisted violently” when authorities tried to handcuff him, according to the documents.

Ambrose told a detective "she was being held against her will," and that Pena took her phone and "refused to let her leave the apartment for the entire time she was held there," according to the documents.

Pena made his first appearance in court on Wednesday, during which it was determined he would undergo a further mental evaluation.

A doctor who examined Pena said he showed signs of psychosis.

Pena will be taken to a mental institution for a more sophisticated screening before he returns to court on Feb. 11.

Ambrose's disappearance began Saturday night after she left Hennessey's Bar in Boston with a man who has been identified and eliminated as a suspect, police said.

Ambrose was then engaged by two men, one of whom was identified as Pena, police said, citing surveillance video.

Pena and the other man were seen on surveillance video watching her stagger across the street before following her, according to documents.

The other man seen on video has since been cleared by detectives, police said Wednesday.

Surveillance video showed Pena physically guiding Ambrose, according to authorities, who said the young woman wasn't going along willingly.

Ambrose's family reported her missing on Sunday, police said, prompting a massive search, and the investigation led authorities on Tuesday to Pena’s apartment.

Ambrose was taken to a hospital, police said. The 23-year-old then returned to her family's home Tuesday night, according to WCVB.

Police are investigating whether Ambrose and the suspect met at the bar or had a chance meeting on the street, authorities said.

ABC News' Brian Hartman, Todd McKee, Darren Reynolds and Karma Allen contributed to this report.

Let's block ads! (Why?)

[post_excerpt] => A 23-year-old woman allegedly held against her will was crying and had "a horrified look on her face" when police found her at her suspected kidnapper's Boston home, according to court documents. Victor Pena, the 38-year-old charged in the kidnapping... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:31:47 [post_date] => 2019-01-23 19:31:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:31:47 [post_modified] => 2019-01-23 19:31:47 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/olivia-ambrose-kidnapping-suspect-due-court-boston-disappearance/story?id=60565083 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => ABC News: U.S. [syndication_source_uri] => http://abcnews.go.com/US/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 8 [syndication_permalink] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/olivia-ambrose-kidnapping-suspect-due-court-boston-disappearance/story?id=60565083 [syndication_item_hash] => bd95961267dd48378ee834ed132f1d28 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 26 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 56 [1] => 61 ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://s.abcnews.com/images/US/boston-3-ht-er-190122_hpMain_2_v12x5_16x9_992.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://s.abcnews.com/images/US/boston-3-ht-er-190122_hpMain_2_v12x5_16x9_992.jpg

Replacing images : - ON

A 23-year-old woman allegedly held against her will was crying and had "a horrified look on her face" when police found her at her suspected kidnapper's Boston home, according to court documents.

Victor Pena, the 38-year-old charged in the kidnapping of Olivia Ambrose, was arrested after authorities say he was found at his Charlestown apartment Tuesday with Ambrose, who vanished Saturday night.

When the investigation into Ambrose's disappearance was intensifying, police followed the last known ping from her phone to an apartment complex. Detectives showed surveillance images to neighbors, who said the suspect looked like Pena, according to the documents obtained by ABC Boston affiliate WCVB.

The missing 23-year-old's phone also re-activated and she began sending messages to her mother, the documents said.

Maintenance staff was called in to open the door to Pena’s apartment on Tuesday, the documents said, and before drilling the lock, detectives waited about 20 minutes and knocked numerous times.

"Once the top lock was dismantled but prior to the lower locks being opened, the detectives heard the locks opening from the inside," the documents said.

Pena, who was at the doorway, "resisted violently” when authorities tried to handcuff him, according to the documents.

Ambrose told a detective "she was being held against her will," and that Pena took her phone and "refused to let her leave the apartment for the entire time she was held there," according to the documents.

Pena made his first appearance in court on Wednesday, during which it was determined he would undergo a further mental evaluation.

A doctor who examined Pena said he showed signs of psychosis.

Pena will be taken to a mental institution for a more sophisticated screening before he returns to court on Feb. 11.

Ambrose's disappearance began Saturday night after she left Hennessey's Bar in Boston with a man who has been identified and eliminated as a suspect, police said.

Ambrose was then engaged by two men, one of whom was identified as Pena, police said, citing surveillance video.

Pena and the other man were seen on surveillance video watching her stagger across the street before following her, according to documents.

The other man seen on video has since been cleared by detectives, police said Wednesday.

Surveillance video showed Pena physically guiding Ambrose, according to authorities, who said the young woman wasn't going along willingly.

Ambrose's family reported her missing on Sunday, police said, prompting a massive search, and the investigation led authorities on Tuesday to Pena’s apartment.

Ambrose was taken to a hospital, police said. The 23-year-old then returned to her family's home Tuesday night, according to WCVB.

Police are investigating whether Ambrose and the suspect met at the bar or had a chance meeting on the street, authorities said.

ABC News' Brian Hartman, Todd McKee, Darren Reynolds and Karma Allen contributed to this report.

Let's block ads! (Why?)

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => ABC News: U.S. [syndication_source_uri] => http://abcnews.go.com/US/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 8 [syndication_permalink] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/olivia-ambrose-kidnapping-suspect-due-court-boston-disappearance/story?id=60565083 [syndication_item_hash] => bd95961267dd48378ee834ed132f1d28 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Alleged kidnapping victim was crying with 'horrified' look when she was found

Array ( [post_title] => Alleged kidnapping victim was crying with 'horrified' look when she was found [post_content] =>

A 23-year-old woman allegedly held against her will was crying and had "a horrified look on her face" when police found her at her suspected kidnapper's Boston home, according to court documents.

Victor Pena, the 38-year-old charged in the kidnapping of Olivia Ambrose, was arrested after authorities say he was found at his Charlestown apartment Tuesday with Ambrose, who vanished Saturday night.

When the investigation into Ambrose's disappearance was intensifying, police followed the last known ping from her phone to an apartment complex. Detectives showed surveillance images to neighbors, who said the suspect looked like Pena, according to the documents obtained by ABC Boston affiliate WCVB.

The missing 23-year-old's phone also re-activated and she began sending messages to her mother, the documents said.

Maintenance staff was called in to open the door to Pena’s apartment on Tuesday, the documents said, and before drilling the lock, detectives waited about 20 minutes and knocked numerous times.

"Once the top lock was dismantled but prior to the lower locks being opened, the detectives heard the locks opening from the inside," the documents said.

Pena, who was at the doorway, "resisted violently” when authorities tried to handcuff him, according to the documents.

Ambrose told a detective "she was being held against her will," and that Pena took her phone and "refused to let her leave the apartment for the entire time she was held there," according to the documents.

Pena made his first appearance in court on Wednesday, during which it was determined he would undergo a further mental evaluation.

A doctor who examined Pena said he showed signs of psychosis.

Pena will be taken to a mental institution for a more sophisticated screening before he returns to court on Feb. 11.

Ambrose's disappearance began Saturday night after she left Hennessey's Bar in Boston with a man who has been identified and eliminated as a suspect, police said.

Ambrose was then engaged by two men, one of whom was identified as Pena, police said, citing surveillance video.

Pena and the other man were seen on surveillance video watching her stagger across the street before following her, according to documents.

The other man seen on video has since been cleared by detectives, police said Wednesday.

Surveillance video showed Pena physically guiding Ambrose, according to authorities, who said the young woman wasn't going along willingly.

Ambrose's family reported her missing on Sunday, police said, prompting a massive search, and the investigation led authorities on Tuesday to Pena’s apartment.

Ambrose was taken to a hospital, police said. The 23-year-old then returned to her family's home Tuesday night, according to WCVB.

Police are investigating whether Ambrose and the suspect met at the bar or had a chance meeting on the street, authorities said.

ABC News' Brian Hartman, Todd McKee, Darren Reynolds and Karma Allen contributed to this report.

Let's block ads! (Why?)

[post_excerpt] => A 23-year-old woman allegedly held against her will was crying and had "a horrified look on her face" when police found her at her suspected kidnapper's Boston home, according to court documents. Victor Pena, the 38-year-old charged in the kidnapping... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:31:47 [post_date] => 2019-01-23 19:31:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:31:47 [post_modified] => 2019-01-23 19:31:47 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/olivia-ambrose-kidnapping-suspect-due-court-boston-disappearance/story?id=60565083 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => ABC News: U.S. [syndication_source_uri] => http://abcnews.go.com/US/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 8 [syndication_permalink] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/olivia-ambrose-kidnapping-suspect-due-court-boston-disappearance/story?id=60565083 [syndication_item_hash] => bd95961267dd48378ee834ed132f1d28 [faf_featured_image] => 340253 [faf_process_image] => 340253 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 26 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 56 [1] => 61 ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Former nurse arrested after woman in vegetative state gives birth

Array ( [post_title] => Former nurse arrested after woman in vegetative state gives birth [post_content] =>

Police in Arizona have made an arrest in connection with a woman who gave birth while in a vegetative state.

The 36-year-old suspect, Nathan Sutherland, was arrested after investigators obtained a DNA sample Tuesday, according to the Phoenix Police Department. Police said that they had determined that his DNA matched the baby’s DNA and he was booked into the Maricopa County Jail without bond on Tuesday after being charged with one count of vulnerable adult abuse and one count of sexual assault.

Authorities said he was responsible for caring for the woman at the time of the alleged abuse that appears to have resulted in the pregnancy, a spokeswoman for the Phoenix Police Department announced in a press conference Wednesday.

Sutherland had been a licensed practical nurse at Hacienda Healthcare in Phoenix since 2011, police said.

He was identified as a person who had access to the victim in the case, and investigators obtained a DNA sample from him yesterday using a court order, police said.

Sutherland was not working at the time police retrieved the evidence.

A statement released through the family's attorney, John Micheaels, on Wednesday said they were aware of the arrest but declined to comment further, asking for privacy.

On Tuesday, Micheaels released a statement saying the family "would like to make clear that their daughter is not in a coma."

"She has significant intellectual disabilities as a result of seizures very early in her childhood," the statement read. "She does not speak but has some ability to move her limbs, head and neck. Their daughter responds to sound and is able to make facial gestures. The important thing is that she is a beloved daughter, albeit with significant intellectual disabilities. She has feelings, likes to be read to, enjoys soft music, and is capable of responding to people she is familiar with, especially family."

The difference between being in a coma and being in a vegetative state is that a patient in a coma is completely unresponsive, does not react to light or sound, cannot feel pain and whose eyes remain closed. Comas normally last for a finite period of time – days, weeks or even months, according to the non-profit American Hospice Foundation.

A patient in a vegetative state is still unconscious, but such a condition can be characterized by involuntary eye movement, teeth-grinding and facial expressions. Some patients in a vegetative state can remain so for years or indefinitely.

After the birth, Hacienda Healthcare released a statement describing the incident as “deeply disturbing,” saying it would fully cooperate with law enforcement in the investigation.

Officials at the facility released a new statement on Wednesday morning in response to the arrest

"Every member of the Hacienda organization is troubled beyond words to think that a licensed practical nurse could be capable of seriously harming a patient," the statement reads, in part. "Once again, we offer an apology and send our deepest sympathies to the client and her family, to the community and to our agency partners at every level.

"Nathan Sutherland, who held a current state of Arizona practical nurse’s license and who had undergone an extensive background check upon hiring – was terminated from Hacienda the moment our leadership team learned of his arrest."

"We will do everything in our power to ensure justice in this case," the statement continues.

Sources told Phoenix CBS affiliate KPHO, which first reported the incident, that the woman had been a patient at the facility for at least 10 years after a near-drowning incident left her in a vegetative state. None of the staff was aware that she was pregnant, a source told the station.

The woman gave birth to a healthy baby boy on Dec. 29, KPHO reported.

After the birth, the facility was mandated to increase security and staff presence during interaction with patients and increase monitoring of patient care areas, the Arizona state Department of Health Services told ABC Phoenix affiliate KNXV earlier this month.

Additionally, another person is required to be in the room when male health-care aides provide treatment to female patients.

On Wednesday, Hacienda Healthcare officials said as part of their statement that security measures have continually increased since news of the incident first surfaced.

It remains unclear whether Sutherland has retained a defense attorney. A spokesman for the Maricopa County Public Defender's office did not immediately respond to an ABC News request to determine whether Sutherland has been assigned a public defender.

ABC News' Clayton Sandell, Bonnie Mclean and Crystal Muguerza contributed to this report.

Let's block ads! (Why?)

[post_excerpt] => Police in Arizona have made an arrest in connection with a woman who gave birth while in a vegetative state. The 36-year-old suspect, Nathan Sutherland, was arrested after investigators obtained a DNA sample Tuesday, according to the Phoenix Police D... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:15:19 [post_date] => 2019-01-23 19:15:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:15:19 [post_modified] => 2019-01-23 19:15:19 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/phoenix-police-make-arrest-connection-woman-gave-birth/story?id=60568859 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => ABC News: U.S. [syndication_source_uri] => http://abcnews.go.com/US/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 8 [syndication_permalink] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/phoenix-police-make-arrest-connection-woman-gave-birth/story?id=60568859 [syndication_item_hash] => Array ( [0] => 5a078a35794813413f93f1581f6e8a31 [1] => 944f9411e2cf7641e8350f5f1feafcd2 ) ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 26 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 56 [1] => 61 ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_name] => phoenix-police-arrest-former-nurse-after-woman-in-vegetative-state-gives-birth-3 )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://s.abcnews.com/images/US/nathan-sutherland-booking-photo-ht-jc-190123_hpMain_16x9_992.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://s.abcnews.com/images/US/nathan-sutherland-booking-photo-ht-jc-190123_hpMain_16x9_992.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Police in Arizona have made an arrest in connection with a woman who gave birth while in a vegetative state.

The 36-year-old suspect, Nathan Sutherland, was arrested after investigators obtained a DNA sample Tuesday, according to the Phoenix Police Department. Police said that they had determined that his DNA matched the baby’s DNA and he was booked into the Maricopa County Jail without bond on Tuesday after being charged with one count of vulnerable adult abuse and one count of sexual assault.

Authorities said he was responsible for caring for the woman at the time of the alleged abuse that appears to have resulted in the pregnancy, a spokeswoman for the Phoenix Police Department announced in a press conference Wednesday.

Sutherland had been a licensed practical nurse at Hacienda Healthcare in Phoenix since 2011, police said.

He was identified as a person who had access to the victim in the case, and investigators obtained a DNA sample from him yesterday using a court order, police said.

Sutherland was not working at the time police retrieved the evidence.

A statement released through the family's attorney, John Micheaels, on Wednesday said they were aware of the arrest but declined to comment further, asking for privacy.

On Tuesday, Micheaels released a statement saying the family "would like to make clear that their daughter is not in a coma."

"She has significant intellectual disabilities as a result of seizures very early in her childhood," the statement read. "She does not speak but has some ability to move her limbs, head and neck. Their daughter responds to sound and is able to make facial gestures. The important thing is that she is a beloved daughter, albeit with significant intellectual disabilities. She has feelings, likes to be read to, enjoys soft music, and is capable of responding to people she is familiar with, especially family."

The difference between being in a coma and being in a vegetative state is that a patient in a coma is completely unresponsive, does not react to light or sound, cannot feel pain and whose eyes remain closed. Comas normally last for a finite period of time – days, weeks or even months, according to the non-profit American Hospice Foundation.

A patient in a vegetative state is still unconscious, but such a condition can be characterized by involuntary eye movement, teeth-grinding and facial expressions. Some patients in a vegetative state can remain so for years or indefinitely.

After the birth, Hacienda Healthcare released a statement describing the incident as “deeply disturbing,” saying it would fully cooperate with law enforcement in the investigation.

Officials at the facility released a new statement on Wednesday morning in response to the arrest

"Every member of the Hacienda organization is troubled beyond words to think that a licensed practical nurse could be capable of seriously harming a patient," the statement reads, in part. "Once again, we offer an apology and send our deepest sympathies to the client and her family, to the community and to our agency partners at every level.

"Nathan Sutherland, who held a current state of Arizona practical nurse’s license and who had undergone an extensive background check upon hiring – was terminated from Hacienda the moment our leadership team learned of his arrest."

"We will do everything in our power to ensure justice in this case," the statement continues.

Sources told Phoenix CBS affiliate KPHO, which first reported the incident, that the woman had been a patient at the facility for at least 10 years after a near-drowning incident left her in a vegetative state. None of the staff was aware that she was pregnant, a source told the station.

The woman gave birth to a healthy baby boy on Dec. 29, KPHO reported.

After the birth, the facility was mandated to increase security and staff presence during interaction with patients and increase monitoring of patient care areas, the Arizona state Department of Health Services told ABC Phoenix affiliate KNXV earlier this month.

Additionally, another person is required to be in the room when male health-care aides provide treatment to female patients.

On Wednesday, Hacienda Healthcare officials said as part of their statement that security measures have continually increased since news of the incident first surfaced.

It remains unclear whether Sutherland has retained a defense attorney. A spokesman for the Maricopa County Public Defender's office did not immediately respond to an ABC News request to determine whether Sutherland has been assigned a public defender.

ABC News' Clayton Sandell, Bonnie Mclean and Crystal Muguerza contributed to this report.

Let's block ads! (Why?)

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => ABC News: U.S. [syndication_source_uri] => http://abcnews.go.com/US/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 8 [syndication_permalink] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/phoenix-police-make-arrest-connection-woman-gave-birth/story?id=60568859 [syndication_item_hash] => Array ( [0] => 5a078a35794813413f93f1581f6e8a31 [1] => 944f9411e2cf7641e8350f5f1feafcd2 ) )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Former nurse arrested after woman in vegetative state gives birth

Array ( [post_title] => Former nurse arrested after woman in vegetative state gives birth [post_content] =>

Police in Arizona have made an arrest in connection with a woman who gave birth while in a vegetative state.

The 36-year-old suspect, Nathan Sutherland, was arrested after investigators obtained a DNA sample Tuesday, according to the Phoenix Police Department. Police said that they had determined that his DNA matched the baby’s DNA and he was booked into the Maricopa County Jail without bond on Tuesday after being charged with one count of vulnerable adult abuse and one count of sexual assault.

Authorities said he was responsible for caring for the woman at the time of the alleged abuse that appears to have resulted in the pregnancy, a spokeswoman for the Phoenix Police Department announced in a press conference Wednesday.

Sutherland had been a licensed practical nurse at Hacienda Healthcare in Phoenix since 2011, police said.

He was identified as a person who had access to the victim in the case, and investigators obtained a DNA sample from him yesterday using a court order, police said.

Sutherland was not working at the time police retrieved the evidence.

A statement released through the family's attorney, John Micheaels, on Wednesday said they were aware of the arrest but declined to comment further, asking for privacy.

On Tuesday, Micheaels released a statement saying the family "would like to make clear that their daughter is not in a coma."

"She has significant intellectual disabilities as a result of seizures very early in her childhood," the statement read. "She does not speak but has some ability to move her limbs, head and neck. Their daughter responds to sound and is able to make facial gestures. The important thing is that she is a beloved daughter, albeit with significant intellectual disabilities. She has feelings, likes to be read to, enjoys soft music, and is capable of responding to people she is familiar with, especially family."

The difference between being in a coma and being in a vegetative state is that a patient in a coma is completely unresponsive, does not react to light or sound, cannot feel pain and whose eyes remain closed. Comas normally last for a finite period of time – days, weeks or even months, according to the non-profit American Hospice Foundation.

A patient in a vegetative state is still unconscious, but such a condition can be characterized by involuntary eye movement, teeth-grinding and facial expressions. Some patients in a vegetative state can remain so for years or indefinitely.

After the birth, Hacienda Healthcare released a statement describing the incident as “deeply disturbing,” saying it would fully cooperate with law enforcement in the investigation.

Officials at the facility released a new statement on Wednesday morning in response to the arrest

"Every member of the Hacienda organization is troubled beyond words to think that a licensed practical nurse could be capable of seriously harming a patient," the statement reads, in part. "Once again, we offer an apology and send our deepest sympathies to the client and her family, to the community and to our agency partners at every level.

"Nathan Sutherland, who held a current state of Arizona practical nurse’s license and who had undergone an extensive background check upon hiring – was terminated from Hacienda the moment our leadership team learned of his arrest."

"We will do everything in our power to ensure justice in this case," the statement continues.

Sources told Phoenix CBS affiliate KPHO, which first reported the incident, that the woman had been a patient at the facility for at least 10 years after a near-drowning incident left her in a vegetative state. None of the staff was aware that she was pregnant, a source told the station.

The woman gave birth to a healthy baby boy on Dec. 29, KPHO reported.

After the birth, the facility was mandated to increase security and staff presence during interaction with patients and increase monitoring of patient care areas, the Arizona state Department of Health Services told ABC Phoenix affiliate KNXV earlier this month.

Additionally, another person is required to be in the room when male health-care aides provide treatment to female patients.

On Wednesday, Hacienda Healthcare officials said as part of their statement that security measures have continually increased since news of the incident first surfaced.

It remains unclear whether Sutherland has retained a defense attorney. A spokesman for the Maricopa County Public Defender's office did not immediately respond to an ABC News request to determine whether Sutherland has been assigned a public defender.

ABC News' Clayton Sandell, Bonnie Mclean and Crystal Muguerza contributed to this report.

Let's block ads! (Why?)

[post_excerpt] => Police in Arizona have made an arrest in connection with a woman who gave birth while in a vegetative state. The 36-year-old suspect, Nathan Sutherland, was arrested after investigators obtained a DNA sample Tuesday, according to the Phoenix Police D... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:15:19 [post_date] => 2019-01-23 19:15:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:15:19 [post_modified] => 2019-01-23 19:15:19 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/phoenix-police-make-arrest-connection-woman-gave-birth/story?id=60568859 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => ABC News: U.S. [syndication_source_uri] => http://abcnews.go.com/US/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 8 [syndication_permalink] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/phoenix-police-make-arrest-connection-woman-gave-birth/story?id=60568859 [syndication_item_hash] => Array ( [0] => 5a078a35794813413f93f1581f6e8a31 [1] => 944f9411e2cf7641e8350f5f1feafcd2 ) [faf_featured_image] => 340256 [faf_process_image] => 340256 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 26 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 56 [1] => 61 ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_name] => phoenix-police-arrest-former-nurse-after-woman-in-vegetative-state-gives-birth-3 )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Steven and Cary Stayner: The tale of two brothers' horror and heroism

Array ( [post_title] => Steven and Cary Stayner: The tale of two brothers' horror and heroism [post_content] =>

The two brothers of the Stayner family are both famous, both tied to the wonder of Yosemite National Park, and both knew unspeakable horror.

Steven Stayner captured the heart of a nation when he helped another child escape from a pedophile, after enduring years of abuse and not wanting to see the child experience the same fate. Cary Stayner will forever be known for marring Yosemite's reputation as a peaceful retreat with the brutal murders of four innocent women.

The Stayner family, made up of the two brothers, their three sisters and parents Kay and Delbert, lived in the secluded farming town of Merced, California, surrounded by almond groves and peach orchards, in the shadow of Yosemite National Park.

Watch the full story on "20/20" FRIDAY, Jan. 25 at 10 p.m. ET on ABC

"They call [Merced] the gateway to Yosemite," said Ted Rowlands, a former reporter who covered Cary Stayner’s story at KNTV for the San Francisco Bay area.

Cary looked out for Steven, according to Cary Stayner's former classmate Jack Bungart. “He loved his brother. You know, hung out with him, played with him.”

Martin Purdy, a friend of the brothers, remembered Cary as a "nice guy."

"He was kind of a quiet guy. Our days would be-- just get on our bikes in the morning and go to the park. Hang out with friends or skateboard," Purdy told ABC News.

The boys were still in elementary school when a man named Kenneth Parnell entered the picture.

Parnell worked at the Yosemite Lodge, located about two hours away from the Stayner home. He befriended a co-worker named Ervin Murphy to assist him in a vile act that would shake the family forever.

"It was a sleety, wintery day," Sean Flynn, a journalist who wrote about both Stayner brothers for Esquire, said. "He and Ervin Murphy got into Ken's big, white Buick and drove into Merced."

It was Dec. 4, 1972. Then-7-year-old Steven Stayner was walking home from school on Highway 140 when Parnell and Murphy were driving towards town. Stayner was lured into the vehicle and abducted.

"Kenneth Parnell stops the car and goes to a payphone, he comes back and tells Steven, 'Your parents, I just spoke to them. They no longer want you,'" investigative journalist Pat LaLama said.

When Steven didn’t make it home from school, his parents sounded the alarm.

"Merced was the lead police department, and so they really mounted a large effort to search. And they searched. And there was just nothing there," said Pat Lunney, an investigator assigned to Steven Stayner’s case.

"Cary was very upset," childhood friend Mike Marchese told ABC News in a 1999 interview. "I heard stories about him going out and wishing on a star, that his brother would come home."

For years, Parnell traveled around California with Steven.

"Steven Stayner had a new father figure, and it was Kenneth Parnell -- who by day, was his father, and by night, was his rapist," Rowlands said.

Steven was told his new name was Dennis Parnell and was enrolled in school. Against the odds, he flourished there.

"He had a great personality," said Lori Duke, who dated Steven in high school but knew him as Dennis. "He was spunky. You could see that he wanted to play and be with kids and be normal."

While Steven was a freshman at Mendocino High School, some 300 miles to the south, his older brother Cary was an upperclassman at Merced High School.

There was a "pall over" Cary, because he was "the kid who had his brother kidnapped," said Bungart.

Cary Stayner "was a very, very good cartoonist," and was voted "most creative" at school, according to Purdy.

Purdy said Cary Stayner always wore a hat. According to Rowlands, "He was wearing a hat because he was compulsively pulling his hair out. Emotionally, Cary Stayner had a tough time during his childhood."

But Cary Stayner also exhibited some behaviors that made others uncomfortable, including, as he later admitted, exposing himself to his sister's friend.

"It seemed as though he had a compulsion with trying to get close to women or be sexual with them," Rowlands said. "But he was unable to develop any sort of interpersonal relationships with any women."

The contrast between the two brothers is "surreal," Flynn said.

"You have one brother who's been subjected to just unspeakable horror for years, but by all appearances he's a happy-go-lucky, jovial kid with a girlfriend. You have the other brother who's left at home. Had no interest in girls, had no interest in people. And it wasn't that he was just a loner, he was a bit of a creepy loner," Flynn said.

By the time Steven was 14, he had been abused and manipulated by Parnell for seven years.

"At some point, Parnell and Steven together realized that Steven was growing up and that he was no longer going to be controlled by Parnell," Lunney said. "Parnell wanted another kid that he could sexually assault."

In February 1980, Parnell decided to capture a new, younger boy.

"He paid a local kid ... to ride with him to the little town of Ukiah, California, puts this high school kid out on the street to go find him a boy, and he finds 5-year-old Timothy White walking home from school," Flynn said.

For two weeks, Steven watched Timothy suffer the separation from his family. Then he took matters into his own hands. His high school girlfriend said he later told her what happened.

"He literally said, 'I was not going to let that child go through what I had already been through. And if I didn’t take care of it now, it would just get worse,'" Duke said.

On March 1, 1980, Steven waited until Parnell was at work and then fled with Timothy. The two hitchhiked to Ukiah, California.

"It’s dark and Timmy can't remember where he lives. So, Steven figures the best thing to do is to take him to the police station," Flynn said.

Not only was Steven able to explain to police what happened to him and Timothy, he was also able to tell them his real name was Steven, not Dennis. Telling police, "I know my first name is Steven" became the most iconic moment in Steven’s remarkable story – later becoming the title of the book and a television movie.

"Steven was a national hero. He returns to Merced triumphant. Within days, he's on 'Good Morning America,'" Flynn said.

On GMA in March 1980, Steven shared with former host David Hartman that it felt "great" to be home. He told Hartman that his parents "didn’t change that much," but his brother and sisters, "they changed a lot. I never recognized either one of them."

At a press conference outside the Stayner house, "everyone was smiling, there was a lot of jubilation, but if you look in the background, there's something worth noting, and it's Cary in his baseball cap, and he's not smiling at all," according to Flynn.

"Cary, as the older brother, had a very strange relationship now with his younger brother, Steven, who was getting all of this attention and who was a different person," Rowlands said.

The brothers, four years apart in age, shared a room, but didn’t get along, according to Rowlands. "Steven didn't understand the rules that he was now expected to live by."

"The first year was kinda hectic," Steven said on GMA in 1983. "For seven years I have been supposedly an only child. Now I had to compete with a brother and three sisters."

Steven also struggled in high school where he was bullied for the tragic abuse he had endured. Flynn said his sexuality was "constantly under attack."

In addition to his fraught life at home and at school, Steven, still just a teenager by this point, also had to face Parnell in court.

Parnell was convicted on kidnapping and false imprisonment charges. He was sentenced to seven years in prison but only served five -- less time than he held Steven captive.

"It was outrageous. There was out and out fury over the sentence," Flynn said. "Ken Parnell went back to what he had been doing for years. He found someone else to help him find another boy, only this time he was caught and he was sent to prison again -- where he died in 2008."

While Steven was grappling with life after his escape, his brother was out of high school with his own troubles.

"I think Cary after high school seemed a little lost, like he didn’t know where he was going," Bungart said.

He was known to take refuge in nearby Yosemite, where he’d drive up and get lost in nature.

"Whatever demons were clamoring around in his head, by being naked, by smoking pot, he could find the peace that he so desperately needed," LaLama said.

Steven Stayner’s fame was short-lived. He grew up, got married and had two kids.

"He was very proud of who he was," his wife, Jodi Stayner, said in 1999. "He was just very well grounded, for a person that had gone through what he had gone through."

Tragically, Steven Stayner was killed in a 1989 motorcycle accident at age 24.

Shortly after Steven’s death, an uncle with whom Cary Stayner was very close was shot and killed in a home they shared together. By this point, Cary Stayner was suffering. Flynn said Satyner had "a couple of nervous breakdowns," one of which was "fairly violent."

"He stated that he felt like jumping in a truck, driving it through the shop and killing the boss and killing everybody in the office, and then torching the place," friend Mark Marchese said in 1999. "That’s when I told him, 'You need to go to a doctor, Cary.'"

But instead of seeking mental health treatment, Stayner "ended up taking refuge" in Yosemite, Rowlands said.

In 1997, Stayner got a job as a handyman at the Cedar Lodge, seven miles from the gate of the national park.

"Working at Cedar Lodge gave Cary access to his beloved Yosemite," Rowlands said. "His idea of serenity was to maybe smoke a little pot and to sunbathe naked."

Stayner had been at Cedar Lodge for two years when Carole Sund, her teenage daughter Juli Sund and her friend Silvina Pelosso came to stay one night in February 1999. That night, he talked his way into their room under the guise of fixing a leak, and then sexually assaulted both girls and brutally murdered all three.

Jeff Rinek, at the time an FBI agent handling Cary Stayner’s case, said the search for the women was the "largest... ever mounted in Yosemite at any time." After several weeks, the bodies of all three women were discovered.

Five months passed without another killing, and the community surrounding Yosemite was lulled into a sense of calm – especially when the FBI announced that those they believed responsible for the murders were in custody. In fact, the wrong men were custody.

On July 21, 1999, when Stayner saw Joie Armstrong, a 26-year-old naturalist at Yosemite who taught children about nature in the park, "something instantly" changed with him, Rowlands said. "He’s ready to kill again.

After her friends reported her missing, police found signs of a struggle at her cabin and half a mile away, they found her body. Her head, which had been removed, was found several feet away in the water.

"There wasn’t really much time for us to speculate on whether this was related, I mean it quickly became related," said Des Kidd, former medical director at Yosemite who participated in search and rescue.

Stayner left a substantial amount of evidence in and around Armstrong’s cottage, but police initially started searching for him because his vehicle had been seen near her place and they thought he would be a "natural witness to interview," Rinek said. Authorities had already interviewed him once before about the other three murders, but at the time he hadn’t raised any red flags.

FBI agents caught up with Stayner at a nudist colony, where he had fled to after Armstrong’s murder. After he was brought in for questioning, he confessed to murdering Joie Armstrong, describing the brutal killing "as if he was reading a soup label," said John Boles, another FBI agent on the case.

Soon after, he confessed to murdering Carole Sund, Juli Sund and Silvina Pelosso.

"I went to ask if Cary wanted to talk. He said, 'I want you to get a hold of some producers in Los Angeles. I want a movie-of-the-week made about my story,'" Rowlands said. "There was a movie made about Steven Stayner. And he wanted the same treatment. He wanted the world to take note."

"It’s difficult for me to picture what Cary has done and knowing Steve because their personalities are completely opposite," Duke, Steven’s former girlfriend, said. "The only time Steve would kill anything like a fish is because we were gonna eat it. You know what I mean? ... I wouldn’t think that he would think of himself as one, but he is a hero."

For the last 20 years, Stayner has been on death row at San Quentin prison. He’s 57 years old.

"As far as I know, he’s never talked to anyone about the effect Steven might have had on his crimes. I’m not sure there is any direct cause and effect," Flynn said. "Steven could have grown up normal happy and healthy and Cary still would’ve been a serial killer."

Let's block ads! (Why?)

[post_excerpt] => The two brothers of the Stayner family are both famous, both tied to the wonder of Yosemite National Park, and both knew unspeakable horror. Steven Stayner captured the heart of a nation when he helped another child escape from a pedophile, after end... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-23 17:59:57 [post_date] => 2019-01-23 17:59:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-23 17:59:57 [post_modified] => 2019-01-23 17:59:57 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/steven-cary-stayner-tale-brothers-horror-heroism/story?id=60529944 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => ABC News: U.S. [syndication_source_uri] => http://abcnews.go.com/US/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 8 [syndication_permalink] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/steven-cary-stayner-tale-brothers-horror-heroism/story?id=60529944 [syndication_item_hash] => Array ( [0] => 8856a50a676c1ece71e8a2a935a26073 [1] => 8856a50a676c1ece71e8a2a935a26073 ) ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 26 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 56 [1] => 61 ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_name] => steven-and-cary-stayner-the-tale-of-two-brothers-horror-and-heroism-2 )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://s.abcnews.com/images/US/stayner-family-ap-jef-190122_hpMain_16x9_992.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://s.abcnews.com/images/US/stayner-family-ap-jef-190122_hpMain_16x9_992.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The two brothers of the Stayner family are both famous, both tied to the wonder of Yosemite National Park, and both knew unspeakable horror.

Steven Stayner captured the heart of a nation when he helped another child escape from a pedophile, after enduring years of abuse and not wanting to see the child experience the same fate. Cary Stayner will forever be known for marring Yosemite's reputation as a peaceful retreat with the brutal murders of four innocent women.

The Stayner family, made up of the two brothers, their three sisters and parents Kay and Delbert, lived in the secluded farming town of Merced, California, surrounded by almond groves and peach orchards, in the shadow of Yosemite National Park.

Watch the full story on "20/20" FRIDAY, Jan. 25 at 10 p.m. ET on ABC

"They call [Merced] the gateway to Yosemite," said Ted Rowlands, a former reporter who covered Cary Stayner’s story at KNTV for the San Francisco Bay area.

Cary looked out for Steven, according to Cary Stayner's former classmate Jack Bungart. “He loved his brother. You know, hung out with him, played with him.”

Martin Purdy, a friend of the brothers, remembered Cary as a "nice guy."

"He was kind of a quiet guy. Our days would be-- just get on our bikes in the morning and go to the park. Hang out with friends or skateboard," Purdy told ABC News.

The boys were still in elementary school when a man named Kenneth Parnell entered the picture.

Parnell worked at the Yosemite Lodge, located about two hours away from the Stayner home. He befriended a co-worker named Ervin Murphy to assist him in a vile act that would shake the family forever.

"It was a sleety, wintery day," Sean Flynn, a journalist who wrote about both Stayner brothers for Esquire, said. "He and Ervin Murphy got into Ken's big, white Buick and drove into Merced."

It was Dec. 4, 1972. Then-7-year-old Steven Stayner was walking home from school on Highway 140 when Parnell and Murphy were driving towards town. Stayner was lured into the vehicle and abducted.

"Kenneth Parnell stops the car and goes to a payphone, he comes back and tells Steven, 'Your parents, I just spoke to them. They no longer want you,'" investigative journalist Pat LaLama said.

When Steven didn’t make it home from school, his parents sounded the alarm.

"Merced was the lead police department, and so they really mounted a large effort to search. And they searched. And there was just nothing there," said Pat Lunney, an investigator assigned to Steven Stayner’s case.

"Cary was very upset," childhood friend Mike Marchese told ABC News in a 1999 interview. "I heard stories about him going out and wishing on a star, that his brother would come home."

For years, Parnell traveled around California with Steven.

"Steven Stayner had a new father figure, and it was Kenneth Parnell -- who by day, was his father, and by night, was his rapist," Rowlands said.

Steven was told his new name was Dennis Parnell and was enrolled in school. Against the odds, he flourished there.

"He had a great personality," said Lori Duke, who dated Steven in high school but knew him as Dennis. "He was spunky. You could see that he wanted to play and be with kids and be normal."

While Steven was a freshman at Mendocino High School, some 300 miles to the south, his older brother Cary was an upperclassman at Merced High School.

There was a "pall over" Cary, because he was "the kid who had his brother kidnapped," said Bungart.

Cary Stayner "was a very, very good cartoonist," and was voted "most creative" at school, according to Purdy.

Purdy said Cary Stayner always wore a hat. According to Rowlands, "He was wearing a hat because he was compulsively pulling his hair out. Emotionally, Cary Stayner had a tough time during his childhood."

But Cary Stayner also exhibited some behaviors that made others uncomfortable, including, as he later admitted, exposing himself to his sister's friend.

"It seemed as though he had a compulsion with trying to get close to women or be sexual with them," Rowlands said. "But he was unable to develop any sort of interpersonal relationships with any women."

The contrast between the two brothers is "surreal," Flynn said.

"You have one brother who's been subjected to just unspeakable horror for years, but by all appearances he's a happy-go-lucky, jovial kid with a girlfriend. You have the other brother who's left at home. Had no interest in girls, had no interest in people. And it wasn't that he was just a loner, he was a bit of a creepy loner," Flynn said.

By the time Steven was 14, he had been abused and manipulated by Parnell for seven years.

"At some point, Parnell and Steven together realized that Steven was growing up and that he was no longer going to be controlled by Parnell," Lunney said. "Parnell wanted another kid that he could sexually assault."

In February 1980, Parnell decided to capture a new, younger boy.

"He paid a local kid ... to ride with him to the little town of Ukiah, California, puts this high school kid out on the street to go find him a boy, and he finds 5-year-old Timothy White walking home from school," Flynn said.

For two weeks, Steven watched Timothy suffer the separation from his family. Then he took matters into his own hands. His high school girlfriend said he later told her what happened.

"He literally said, 'I was not going to let that child go through what I had already been through. And if I didn’t take care of it now, it would just get worse,'" Duke said.

On March 1, 1980, Steven waited until Parnell was at work and then fled with Timothy. The two hitchhiked to Ukiah, California.

"It’s dark and Timmy can't remember where he lives. So, Steven figures the best thing to do is to take him to the police station," Flynn said.

Not only was Steven able to explain to police what happened to him and Timothy, he was also able to tell them his real name was Steven, not Dennis. Telling police, "I know my first name is Steven" became the most iconic moment in Steven’s remarkable story – later becoming the title of the book and a television movie.

"Steven was a national hero. He returns to Merced triumphant. Within days, he's on 'Good Morning America,'" Flynn said.

On GMA in March 1980, Steven shared with former host David Hartman that it felt "great" to be home. He told Hartman that his parents "didn’t change that much," but his brother and sisters, "they changed a lot. I never recognized either one of them."

At a press conference outside the Stayner house, "everyone was smiling, there was a lot of jubilation, but if you look in the background, there's something worth noting, and it's Cary in his baseball cap, and he's not smiling at all," according to Flynn.

"Cary, as the older brother, had a very strange relationship now with his younger brother, Steven, who was getting all of this attention and who was a different person," Rowlands said.

The brothers, four years apart in age, shared a room, but didn’t get along, according to Rowlands. "Steven didn't understand the rules that he was now expected to live by."

"The first year was kinda hectic," Steven said on GMA in 1983. "For seven years I have been supposedly an only child. Now I had to compete with a brother and three sisters."

Steven also struggled in high school where he was bullied for the tragic abuse he had endured. Flynn said his sexuality was "constantly under attack."

In addition to his fraught life at home and at school, Steven, still just a teenager by this point, also had to face Parnell in court.

Parnell was convicted on kidnapping and false imprisonment charges. He was sentenced to seven years in prison but only served five -- less time than he held Steven captive.

"It was outrageous. There was out and out fury over the sentence," Flynn said. "Ken Parnell went back to what he had been doing for years. He found someone else to help him find another boy, only this time he was caught and he was sent to prison again -- where he died in 2008."

While Steven was grappling with life after his escape, his brother was out of high school with his own troubles.

"I think Cary after high school seemed a little lost, like he didn’t know where he was going," Bungart said.

He was known to take refuge in nearby Yosemite, where he’d drive up and get lost in nature.

"Whatever demons were clamoring around in his head, by being naked, by smoking pot, he could find the peace that he so desperately needed," LaLama said.

Steven Stayner’s fame was short-lived. He grew up, got married and had two kids.

"He was very proud of who he was," his wife, Jodi Stayner, said in 1999. "He was just very well grounded, for a person that had gone through what he had gone through."

Tragically, Steven Stayner was killed in a 1989 motorcycle accident at age 24.

Shortly after Steven’s death, an uncle with whom Cary Stayner was very close was shot and killed in a home they shared together. By this point, Cary Stayner was suffering. Flynn said Satyner had "a couple of nervous breakdowns," one of which was "fairly violent."

"He stated that he felt like jumping in a truck, driving it through the shop and killing the boss and killing everybody in the office, and then torching the place," friend Mark Marchese said in 1999. "That’s when I told him, 'You need to go to a doctor, Cary.'"

But instead of seeking mental health treatment, Stayner "ended up taking refuge" in Yosemite, Rowlands said.

In 1997, Stayner got a job as a handyman at the Cedar Lodge, seven miles from the gate of the national park.

"Working at Cedar Lodge gave Cary access to his beloved Yosemite," Rowlands said. "His idea of serenity was to maybe smoke a little pot and to sunbathe naked."

Stayner had been at Cedar Lodge for two years when Carole Sund, her teenage daughter Juli Sund and her friend Silvina Pelosso came to stay one night in February 1999. That night, he talked his way into their room under the guise of fixing a leak, and then sexually assaulted both girls and brutally murdered all three.

Jeff Rinek, at the time an FBI agent handling Cary Stayner’s case, said the search for the women was the "largest... ever mounted in Yosemite at any time." After several weeks, the bodies of all three women were discovered.

Five months passed without another killing, and the community surrounding Yosemite was lulled into a sense of calm – especially when the FBI announced that those they believed responsible for the murders were in custody. In fact, the wrong men were custody.

On July 21, 1999, when Stayner saw Joie Armstrong, a 26-year-old naturalist at Yosemite who taught children about nature in the park, "something instantly" changed with him, Rowlands said. "He’s ready to kill again.

After her friends reported her missing, police found signs of a struggle at her cabin and half a mile away, they found her body. Her head, which had been removed, was found several feet away in the water.

"There wasn’t really much time for us to speculate on whether this was related, I mean it quickly became related," said Des Kidd, former medical director at Yosemite who participated in search and rescue.

Stayner left a substantial amount of evidence in and around Armstrong’s cottage, but police initially started searching for him because his vehicle had been seen near her place and they thought he would be a "natural witness to interview," Rinek said. Authorities had already interviewed him once before about the other three murders, but at the time he hadn’t raised any red flags.

FBI agents caught up with Stayner at a nudist colony, where he had fled to after Armstrong’s murder. After he was brought in for questioning, he confessed to murdering Joie Armstrong, describing the brutal killing "as if he was reading a soup label," said John Boles, another FBI agent on the case.

Soon after, he confessed to murdering Carole Sund, Juli Sund and Silvina Pelosso.

"I went to ask if Cary wanted to talk. He said, 'I want you to get a hold of some producers in Los Angeles. I want a movie-of-the-week made about my story,'" Rowlands said. "There was a movie made about Steven Stayner. And he wanted the same treatment. He wanted the world to take note."

"It’s difficult for me to picture what Cary has done and knowing Steve because their personalities are completely opposite," Duke, Steven’s former girlfriend, said. "The only time Steve would kill anything like a fish is because we were gonna eat it. You know what I mean? ... I wouldn’t think that he would think of himself as one, but he is a hero."

For the last 20 years, Stayner has been on death row at San Quentin prison. He’s 57 years old.

"As far as I know, he’s never talked to anyone about the effect Steven might have had on his crimes. I’m not sure there is any direct cause and effect," Flynn said. "Steven could have grown up normal happy and healthy and Cary still would’ve been a serial killer."

Let's block ads! (Why?)

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => ABC News: U.S. [syndication_source_uri] => http://abcnews.go.com/US/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 8 [syndication_permalink] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/steven-cary-stayner-tale-brothers-horror-heroism/story?id=60529944 [syndication_item_hash] => Array ( [0] => 8856a50a676c1ece71e8a2a935a26073 [1] => 8856a50a676c1ece71e8a2a935a26073 ) )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Steven and Cary Stayner: The tale of two brothers' horror and heroism

Array ( [post_title] => Steven and Cary Stayner: The tale of two brothers' horror and heroism [post_content] =>

The two brothers of the Stayner family are both famous, both tied to the wonder of Yosemite National Park, and both knew unspeakable horror.

Steven Stayner captured the heart of a nation when he helped another child escape from a pedophile, after enduring years of abuse and not wanting to see the child experience the same fate. Cary Stayner will forever be known for marring Yosemite's reputation as a peaceful retreat with the brutal murders of four innocent women.

The Stayner family, made up of the two brothers, their three sisters and parents Kay and Delbert, lived in the secluded farming town of Merced, California, surrounded by almond groves and peach orchards, in the shadow of Yosemite National Park.

Watch the full story on "20/20" FRIDAY, Jan. 25 at 10 p.m. ET on ABC

"They call [Merced] the gateway to Yosemite," said Ted Rowlands, a former reporter who covered Cary Stayner’s story at KNTV for the San Francisco Bay area.

Cary looked out for Steven, according to Cary Stayner's former classmate Jack Bungart. “He loved his brother. You know, hung out with him, played with him.”

Martin Purdy, a friend of the brothers, remembered Cary as a "nice guy."

"He was kind of a quiet guy. Our days would be-- just get on our bikes in the morning and go to the park. Hang out with friends or skateboard," Purdy told ABC News.

The boys were still in elementary school when a man named Kenneth Parnell entered the picture.

Parnell worked at the Yosemite Lodge, located about two hours away from the Stayner home. He befriended a co-worker named Ervin Murphy to assist him in a vile act that would shake the family forever.

"It was a sleety, wintery day," Sean Flynn, a journalist who wrote about both Stayner brothers for Esquire, said. "He and Ervin Murphy got into Ken's big, white Buick and drove into Merced."

It was Dec. 4, 1972. Then-7-year-old Steven Stayner was walking home from school on Highway 140 when Parnell and Murphy were driving towards town. Stayner was lured into the vehicle and abducted.

"Kenneth Parnell stops the car and goes to a payphone, he comes back and tells Steven, 'Your parents, I just spoke to them. They no longer want you,'" investigative journalist Pat LaLama said.

When Steven didn’t make it home from school, his parents sounded the alarm.

"Merced was the lead police department, and so they really mounted a large effort to search. And they searched. And there was just nothing there," said Pat Lunney, an investigator assigned to Steven Stayner’s case.

"Cary was very upset," childhood friend Mike Marchese told ABC News in a 1999 interview. "I heard stories about him going out and wishing on a star, that his brother would come home."

For years, Parnell traveled around California with Steven.

"Steven Stayner had a new father figure, and it was Kenneth Parnell -- who by day, was his father, and by night, was his rapist," Rowlands said.

Steven was told his new name was Dennis Parnell and was enrolled in school. Against the odds, he flourished there.

"He had a great personality," said Lori Duke, who dated Steven in high school but knew him as Dennis. "He was spunky. You could see that he wanted to play and be with kids and be normal."

While Steven was a freshman at Mendocino High School, some 300 miles to the south, his older brother Cary was an upperclassman at Merced High School.

There was a "pall over" Cary, because he was "the kid who had his brother kidnapped," said Bungart.

Cary Stayner "was a very, very good cartoonist," and was voted "most creative" at school, according to Purdy.

Purdy said Cary Stayner always wore a hat. According to Rowlands, "He was wearing a hat because he was compulsively pulling his hair out. Emotionally, Cary Stayner had a tough time during his childhood."

But Cary Stayner also exhibited some behaviors that made others uncomfortable, including, as he later admitted, exposing himself to his sister's friend.

"It seemed as though he had a compulsion with trying to get close to women or be sexual with them," Rowlands said. "But he was unable to develop any sort of interpersonal relationships with any women."

The contrast between the two brothers is "surreal," Flynn said.

"You have one brother who's been subjected to just unspeakable horror for years, but by all appearances he's a happy-go-lucky, jovial kid with a girlfriend. You have the other brother who's left at home. Had no interest in girls, had no interest in people. And it wasn't that he was just a loner, he was a bit of a creepy loner," Flynn said.

By the time Steven was 14, he had been abused and manipulated by Parnell for seven years.

"At some point, Parnell and Steven together realized that Steven was growing up and that he was no longer going to be controlled by Parnell," Lunney said. "Parnell wanted another kid that he could sexually assault."

In February 1980, Parnell decided to capture a new, younger boy.

"He paid a local kid ... to ride with him to the little town of Ukiah, California, puts this high school kid out on the street to go find him a boy, and he finds 5-year-old Timothy White walking home from school," Flynn said.

For two weeks, Steven watched Timothy suffer the separation from his family. Then he took matters into his own hands. His high school girlfriend said he later told her what happened.

"He literally said, 'I was not going to let that child go through what I had already been through. And if I didn’t take care of it now, it would just get worse,'" Duke said.

On March 1, 1980, Steven waited until Parnell was at work and then fled with Timothy. The two hitchhiked to Ukiah, California.

"It’s dark and Timmy can't remember where he lives. So, Steven figures the best thing to do is to take him to the police station," Flynn said.

Not only was Steven able to explain to police what happened to him and Timothy, he was also able to tell them his real name was Steven, not Dennis. Telling police, "I know my first name is Steven" became the most iconic moment in Steven’s remarkable story – later becoming the title of the book and a television movie.

"Steven was a national hero. He returns to Merced triumphant. Within days, he's on 'Good Morning America,'" Flynn said.

On GMA in March 1980, Steven shared with former host David Hartman that it felt "great" to be home. He told Hartman that his parents "didn’t change that much," but his brother and sisters, "they changed a lot. I never recognized either one of them."

At a press conference outside the Stayner house, "everyone was smiling, there was a lot of jubilation, but if you look in the background, there's something worth noting, and it's Cary in his baseball cap, and he's not smiling at all," according to Flynn.

"Cary, as the older brother, had a very strange relationship now with his younger brother, Steven, who was getting all of this attention and who was a different person," Rowlands said.

The brothers, four years apart in age, shared a room, but didn’t get along, according to Rowlands. "Steven didn't understand the rules that he was now expected to live by."

"The first year was kinda hectic," Steven said on GMA in 1983. "For seven years I have been supposedly an only child. Now I had to compete with a brother and three sisters."

Steven also struggled in high school where he was bullied for the tragic abuse he had endured. Flynn said his sexuality was "constantly under attack."

In addition to his fraught life at home and at school, Steven, still just a teenager by this point, also had to face Parnell in court.

Parnell was convicted on kidnapping and false imprisonment charges. He was sentenced to seven years in prison but only served five -- less time than he held Steven captive.

"It was outrageous. There was out and out fury over the sentence," Flynn said. "Ken Parnell went back to what he had been doing for years. He found someone else to help him find another boy, only this time he was caught and he was sent to prison again -- where he died in 2008."

While Steven was grappling with life after his escape, his brother was out of high school with his own troubles.

"I think Cary after high school seemed a little lost, like he didn’t know where he was going," Bungart said.

He was known to take refuge in nearby Yosemite, where he’d drive up and get lost in nature.

"Whatever demons were clamoring around in his head, by being naked, by smoking pot, he could find the peace that he so desperately needed," LaLama said.

Steven Stayner’s fame was short-lived. He grew up, got married and had two kids.

"He was very proud of who he was," his wife, Jodi Stayner, said in 1999. "He was just very well grounded, for a person that had gone through what he had gone through."

Tragically, Steven Stayner was killed in a 1989 motorcycle accident at age 24.

Shortly after Steven’s death, an uncle with whom Cary Stayner was very close was shot and killed in a home they shared together. By this point, Cary Stayner was suffering. Flynn said Satyner had "a couple of nervous breakdowns," one of which was "fairly violent."

"He stated that he felt like jumping in a truck, driving it through the shop and killing the boss and killing everybody in the office, and then torching the place," friend Mark Marchese said in 1999. "That’s when I told him, 'You need to go to a doctor, Cary.'"

But instead of seeking mental health treatment, Stayner "ended up taking refuge" in Yosemite, Rowlands said.

In 1997, Stayner got a job as a handyman at the Cedar Lodge, seven miles from the gate of the national park.

"Working at Cedar Lodge gave Cary access to his beloved Yosemite," Rowlands said. "His idea of serenity was to maybe smoke a little pot and to sunbathe naked."

Stayner had been at Cedar Lodge for two years when Carole Sund, her teenage daughter Juli Sund and her friend Silvina Pelosso came to stay one night in February 1999. That night, he talked his way into their room under the guise of fixing a leak, and then sexually assaulted both girls and brutally murdered all three.

Jeff Rinek, at the time an FBI agent handling Cary Stayner’s case, said the search for the women was the "largest... ever mounted in Yosemite at any time." After several weeks, the bodies of all three women were discovered.

Five months passed without another killing, and the community surrounding Yosemite was lulled into a sense of calm – especially when the FBI announced that those they believed responsible for the murders were in custody. In fact, the wrong men were custody.

On July 21, 1999, when Stayner saw Joie Armstrong, a 26-year-old naturalist at Yosemite who taught children about nature in the park, "something instantly" changed with him, Rowlands said. "He’s ready to kill again.

After her friends reported her missing, police found signs of a struggle at her cabin and half a mile away, they found her body. Her head, which had been removed, was found several feet away in the water.

"There wasn’t really much time for us to speculate on whether this was related, I mean it quickly became related," said Des Kidd, former medical director at Yosemite who participated in search and rescue.

Stayner left a substantial amount of evidence in and around Armstrong’s cottage, but police initially started searching for him because his vehicle had been seen near her place and they thought he would be a "natural witness to interview," Rinek said. Authorities had already interviewed him once before about the other three murders, but at the time he hadn’t raised any red flags.

FBI agents caught up with Stayner at a nudist colony, where he had fled to after Armstrong’s murder. After he was brought in for questioning, he confessed to murdering Joie Armstrong, describing the brutal killing "as if he was reading a soup label," said John Boles, another FBI agent on the case.

Soon after, he confessed to murdering Carole Sund, Juli Sund and Silvina Pelosso.

"I went to ask if Cary wanted to talk. He said, 'I want you to get a hold of some producers in Los Angeles. I want a movie-of-the-week made about my story,'" Rowlands said. "There was a movie made about Steven Stayner. And he wanted the same treatment. He wanted the world to take note."

"It’s difficult for me to picture what Cary has done and knowing Steve because their personalities are completely opposite," Duke, Steven’s former girlfriend, said. "The only time Steve would kill anything like a fish is because we were gonna eat it. You know what I mean? ... I wouldn’t think that he would think of himself as one, but he is a hero."

For the last 20 years, Stayner has been on death row at San Quentin prison. He’s 57 years old.

"As far as I know, he’s never talked to anyone about the effect Steven might have had on his crimes. I’m not sure there is any direct cause and effect," Flynn said. "Steven could have grown up normal happy and healthy and Cary still would’ve been a serial killer."

Let's block ads! (Why?)

[post_excerpt] => The two brothers of the Stayner family are both famous, both tied to the wonder of Yosemite National Park, and both knew unspeakable horror. Steven Stayner captured the heart of a nation when he helped another child escape from a pedophile, after end... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-23 17:59:57 [post_date] => 2019-01-23 17:59:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-23 17:59:57 [post_modified] => 2019-01-23 17:59:57 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/steven-cary-stayner-tale-brothers-horror-heroism/story?id=60529944 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => ABC News: U.S. [syndication_source_uri] => http://abcnews.go.com/US/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2Fabcnews%2Fusheadlines&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 8 [syndication_permalink] => https://abcnews.go.com/US/steven-cary-stayner-tale-brothers-horror-heroism/story?id=60529944 [syndication_item_hash] => Array ( [0] => 8856a50a676c1ece71e8a2a935a26073 [1] => 8856a50a676c1ece71e8a2a935a26073 ) [faf_featured_image] => 340259 [faf_process_image] => 340259 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 26 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 56 [1] => 61 ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_name] => steven-and-cary-stayner-the-tale-of-two-brothers-horror-and-heroism-2 )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Speedboat killer Jack Shepherd hands himself in to police

Array ( [post_title] => Speedboat killer Jack Shepherd hands himself in to police [post_content] =>

A man convicted of killing his date in a speedboat crash on the River Thames has handed himself in to police in Georgia after months on the run.

Jack Shepherd was sentenced to six years in July for the manslaughter of 24-year-old Charlotte Brown.

The 31-year-old had been in the Georgian capital of Tbilisi since March and was absent throughout his trial.

Ms Brown's father Graham Brown said: "I feel very emotional at the fact that my daughter will get some justice."

Speaking to BBC Radio 5 live, he added: "I do think the family will be in a much better position to deal with our loss and heartbreak over the last three years."

Mr Brown, who earlier on Wednesday gave an interview to the Victoria Derbyshire programme urging Shepherd to hand himself in, described the fugitive as "a very crass, reckless man who stuck two fingers up to the judiciary system".

"He's done the right thing and thank goodness he has handed himself in," he added.

A spokesman for the Georgian Embassy in London confirmed Shepherd's arrest, which comes after Ms Brown's family met with the Home Secretary Sajid Javid on Tuesday.

Under current diplomatic agreements between Georgia and the UK, Shepherd is eligible for extradition.

Georgian Rustavi TV has shown footage of him before he handed himself in, during an "exclusive interview" in his final minutes as a "free man".

Speaking in English, which was then voiced over and translated into Georgian, Shepherd described it as "a tragic accident".

He said: "The boat had faults, but experts invited by my defence established that these faults developed when the boat was removed from the water.

"Charlotte was driving the boat when the accident happened but unfortunately this fact was forgotten and the media did not mention it either."

Ms Brown's sister Katie Brown said her family were "relieved" of Shepherd handing himself in but described him as "arrogant".

"To just stroll in with a very smug look on his face and to claim innocence is unbelievable. This is a small amount of justice for my sister."

The Ministry of Internal Affairs of Georgia, the law enforcement agency in the country, previously told the BBC it was working with the Met Police to track Shepherd.

The Met said it was informed by the National Crime Agency (NCA) that Shepherd was in the custody of police in Georgia.

In a statement, the force added: "His identity is yet to be officially confirmed. However, if the man is confirmed as Shepherd, extradition proceedings will begin immediately."

After meeting on the dating website OkCupid, Shepherd took Ms Brown on a date on 8 December 2015.

Shepherd spent £150 on wine and food at a restaurant in The Shard before taking her on a speedboat he claimed he owned.

Ms Brown and Shepherd were thrown from the boat when it hit branches in the water near Wandsworth Bridge at about midnight.

Shepherd was found clinging to the hull and Ms Brown, from Clacton in Essex, was pulled from the water unconscious and unresponsive.

A post-mortem examination found she died from cold water immersion.

At the scene in Tbilisi

By BBC correspondent Rayhan Demytrie

I am currently outside the police station where Jack Shepherd, who is now officially under arrest, is currently being held.

He will be moved to a temporary detention centre and his lawyer says according to Georgian law the detention period in this kind of case can be up to nine months.

But it will be up to a judge to decide how long Shepherd will be in the custody of the Georgian police.

Shepherd gave an interview to a local television station where he maintains his innocence.

He says he does not agree with the court's decision and that he is now ready to co-operate with the investigation.


Shepherd made his first appearance at the Old Bailey on 26 January, when he entered a not guilty plea to a charge of manslaughter by gross negligence.

He was released on unconditional bail by Judge Richard Marks QC, but failed to show up for his trial in July.

After his conviction an international arrest warrant was issued.

Despite being on the run, Shepherd has won the right to appeal against his conviction.

Shepherd's solicitor Richard Egan said: "In the light of today's developments I don't think it would be appropriate to comment further until Mr Shepherd is back in the jurisdiction."

Let's block ads! (Why?)

[post_excerpt] => A man convicted of killing his date in a speedboat crash on the River Thames has handed himself in to police in Georgia after months on the run.Jack Shepherd was sentenced to six years in Jul... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:19:32 [post_date] => 2019-01-23 19:19:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-23 19:19:32 [post_modified] => 2019-01-23 19:19:32 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-46979066 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => BBC News - UK [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ [syndication_source_id] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Ffeeds.bbci.co.uk%2Fnews%2Fuk%2Frss.xml&max=3 [syndication_feed] => http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Ffeeds.bbci.co.uk%2Fnews%2Fuk%2Frss.xml&max=3 [syndication_feed_id] => 16 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-46979066 [syndication_item_hash] => Array ( [0] => dd5ba22139b20cc1cd5ebf1373322edd [1] => 989f048092a66ebe7ff16328564af594 [2] => 36c97266e96c5c4bfc97aa53cb243af0 [3] => 142f78d9fdf16332190189922a82f142 [4] => 142f78d9fdf16332190189922a82f142 [5] => d09aa948a1229b3907d5c29f34d709a3 [6] => d09aa948a1229b3907d5c29f34d709a3 [7] => d09aa948a1229b3907d5c29f34d709a3 [8] => 325f6cf9b0c2864e5d90c7ae3e600ce4 ) ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1075 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 171 ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_name] => speedboat-killer-jack-shepherd-hands-himself-in-to-police-2 )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/1024/branded_news/749B/production/_105315892_isjus.png

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/1024/branded_news/749B/production/_105315892_isjus.png

Image exists, checking for same file size