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Andy Murray: Briton beats Stan Wawrinka to win first title since hip surgery

Array ( [post_title] => Andy Murray: Briton beats Stan Wawrinka to win first title since hip surgery [post_content] =>

Andy Murray

Andy Murray broke down in tears after winning his first singles title since career-saving hip surgery by beating Stan Wawrinka at the European Open.

The Briton, 32, launched a stunning comeback from a set and a break down to win 3-6 6-4 6-4 in Antwerp to take his first title for more than two years.

Murray had surgery in January and was playing in just his seventh tournament since returning to singles.

He described it as "one of the biggest" wins of his career.

"It means a lot," the three-time Grand Slam champion said. "The last few years have been extremely difficult.

"I didn't expect to be in this position at all. I'm happy, very happy."

Fellow Grand Slam champion Wawrinka, who has also had a number of recent injury issues, said: "To see you back at this level, it's amazing.

"We're all really happy. I'm sad I lost today but I'm really happy to see you back."

A title 961 days - and one new hip - later

Andy Murray and Stan Wawrinka

At the Australian Open in January a tearful Murray said he feared his hip problem would force him to retire after the tournament.

But the Scot made a promising return to doubles action in June and then made his singles comeback in August and in doing so became the first player to resume his career after a hip resurfacing operation.

His comeback had been encouraging, reaching the quarter-finals of the China Open, but on Sunday in Belgium he produced his best performance yet against a fellow Grand Slam champion who was playing close to his best.

Murray played well in the first set but was overcome by Wawrinka's scintillating hitting which continued into the second set when the Swiss hit four winners to win Murray's serve for a set and a break lead.

Murray crucially saved two more break points soon after to stop himself falling two breaks behind and then won three games in a row before forcing the decider through his trademark athletic tennis.

Both players looked nervous at the start of the third set with four consecutive breaks of serve but at 4-4 Murray saved two more critical break points, the second seen off with a big first serve.

In the following game, Wawrinka surged ahead but at 40-15 he hit a volley to a Murray lob that looked to be going wide and then Murray hit a running passing shot winner to move to deuce.

Shortly afterwards, on Murray's first match point, Wawrinka hit a forehand wide and, after the pair embraced at the net, Murray was visibly emotional as he waved to the crowd.

'Hip hip hurray' - reaction

Former British number one Greg Rusedski: "Andy Murray has won his first ATP singles title with a metal hip. Incredible effort. What a competitor to win from a set and a break down against Stan the man. Who would have believed it. Amazing."

Great Britain's Davis Cup captain Leon Smith: "An astonishing effort Andy Murray. So so proud of you!!!!"

BBC North America editor Jon Sopel: "Best news of the day. Who'd have thought it? Andy your spirit and your fight are remarkable. Skill has never been in doubt."

Former world number three Ivan Ljubicic: "Hip hip hurray Murray. Amazing stuff. Congrats to the whole team."

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Andy Murray

Andy Murray broke down in tears after winning his first singles title since career-saving hip surgery by beating Stan Wawrinka at the European Open.

The Briton, 32, launched a stunning comeback from a set and a break down to win 3-6 6-4 6-4 in Antwerp to take his first title for more than two years.

Murray had surgery in January and was playing in just his seventh tournament since returning to singles.

He described it as "one of the biggest" wins of his career.

"It means a lot," the three-time Grand Slam champion said. "The last few years have been extremely difficult.

"I didn't expect to be in this position at all. I'm happy, very happy."

Fellow Grand Slam champion Wawrinka, who has also had a number of recent injury issues, said: "To see you back at this level, it's amazing.

"We're all really happy. I'm sad I lost today but I'm really happy to see you back."

A title 961 days - and one new hip - later

Andy Murray and Stan Wawrinka

At the Australian Open in January a tearful Murray said he feared his hip problem would force him to retire after the tournament.

But the Scot made a promising return to doubles action in June and then made his singles comeback in August and in doing so became the first player to resume his career after a hip resurfacing operation.

His comeback had been encouraging, reaching the quarter-finals of the China Open, but on Sunday in Belgium he produced his best performance yet against a fellow Grand Slam champion who was playing close to his best.

Murray played well in the first set but was overcome by Wawrinka's scintillating hitting which continued into the second set when the Swiss hit four winners to win Murray's serve for a set and a break lead.

Murray crucially saved two more break points soon after to stop himself falling two breaks behind and then won three games in a row before forcing the decider through his trademark athletic tennis.

Both players looked nervous at the start of the third set with four consecutive breaks of serve but at 4-4 Murray saved two more critical break points, the second seen off with a big first serve.

In the following game, Wawrinka surged ahead but at 40-15 he hit a volley to a Murray lob that looked to be going wide and then Murray hit a running passing shot winner to move to deuce.

Shortly afterwards, on Murray's first match point, Wawrinka hit a forehand wide and, after the pair embraced at the net, Murray was visibly emotional as he waved to the crowd.

'Hip hip hurray' - reaction

Former British number one Greg Rusedski: "Andy Murray has won his first ATP singles title with a metal hip. Incredible effort. What a competitor to win from a set and a break down against Stan the man. Who would have believed it. Amazing."

Great Britain's Davis Cup captain Leon Smith: "An astonishing effort Andy Murray. So so proud of you!!!!"

BBC North America editor Jon Sopel: "Best news of the day. Who'd have thought it? Andy your spirit and your fight are remarkable. Skill has never been in doubt."

Former world number three Ivan Ljubicic: "Hip hip hurray Murray. Amazing stuff. Congrats to the whole team."

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Andy Murray: Briton beats Stan Wawrinka to win first title since hip surgery

Array ( [post_title] => Andy Murray: Briton beats Stan Wawrinka to win first title since hip surgery [post_content] =>

Andy Murray broke down in tears after winning his first singles title since career-saving hip surgery by beating Stan Wawrinka at the European Open.

The Briton, 32, launched a stunning comeback from a set and a break down to win 3-6 6-4 6-4 in Antwerp to take his first title for more than two years.

Murray had surgery in January and was playing in just his seventh tournament since returning to singles.

He described it as "one of the biggest" wins of his career.

"It means a lot," the three-time Grand Slam champion said. "The last few years have been extremely difficult.

"I didn't expect to be in this position at all. I'm happy, very happy."

Fellow Grand Slam champion Wawrinka, who has also had a number of recent injury issues, said: "To see you back at this level, it's amazing.

"We're all really happy. I'm sad I lost today but I'm really happy to see you back."

A title 961 days - and one new hip - later

Andy Murray and Stan Wawrinka

At the Australian Open in January a tearful Murray said he feared his hip problem would force him to retire after the tournament.

But the Scot made a promising return to doubles action in June and then made his singles comeback in August and in doing so became the first player to resume his career after a hip resurfacing operation.

His comeback had been encouraging, reaching the quarter-finals of the China Open, but on Sunday in Belgium he produced his best performance yet against a fellow Grand Slam champion who was playing close to his best.

Murray played well in the first set but was overcome by Wawrinka's scintillating hitting which continued into the second set when the Swiss hit four winners to win Murray's serve for a set and a break lead.

Murray crucially saved two more break points soon after to stop himself falling two breaks behind and then won three games in a row before forcing the decider through his trademark athletic tennis.

Both players looked nervous at the start of the third set with four consecutive breaks of serve but at 4-4 Murray saved two more critical break points, the second seen off with a big first serve.

In the following game, Wawrinka surged ahead but at 40-15 he hit a volley to a Murray lob that looked to be going wide and then Murray hit a running passing shot winner to move to deuce.

Shortly afterwards, on Murray's first match point, Wawrinka hit a forehand wide and, after the pair embraced at the net, Murray was visibly emotional as he waved to the crowd.

'Hip hip hurray' - reaction

Former British number one Greg Rusedski: "Andy Murray has won his first ATP singles title with a metal hip. Incredible effort. What a competitor to win from a set and a break down against Stan the man. Who would have believed it. Amazing."

Great Britain's Davis Cup captain Leon Smith: "An astonishing effort Andy Murray. So so proud of you!!!!"

BBC North America editor Jon Sopel: "Best news of the day. Who'd have thought it? Andy your spirit and your fight are remarkable. Skill has never been in doubt."

Former world number three Ivan Ljubicic: "Hip hip hurray Murray. Amazing stuff. Congrats to the whole team."

Let's block ads! (Why?)

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Brexit: Johnson 'has the numbers' in Commons to pass deal, says Raab

Array ( [post_title] => Brexit: Johnson 'has the numbers' in Commons to pass deal, says Raab [post_content] =>

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The government says it will push ahead with efforts to pass its Brexit deal, despite a major setback to its plans.

Boris Johnson had to ask the EU for an extension to the UK's 31 October exit date after MPs backed a move to delay approval of the deal on Saturday.

But Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said he was confident enough MPs would back the deal next week, and Brexit would still happen by the deadline.

Labour, however, has said it will back moves to put the deal to a referendum.

No 10 said the PM sent "Parliament's letter" to Brussels - unsigned - and accompanied it with a second letter - which was signed - explaining why he believed a delay would be a mistake.

The government has vowed to press ahead with the legislation - the Withdrawal Agreement Bill (WAB) - to implement the Brexit deal next week.

Why has the PM asked for another extension?

Having reached a new Brexit deal with the EU last week, the prime minster had intended to bring it to Parliament and ask MPs to approve it in a so-called "meaningful vote".

However, in the first Saturday sitting in the Commons for 37 years, MPs instead voted in favour of an amendment withholding approval of the deal until all the necessary legislation to implement it had been passed.

Tabled by Tory MP Sir Oliver Letwin, the amendment was intended to ensure that Mr Johnson would comply with the terms of the so-called Benn Act designed to eliminate any possibility of a no-deal exit on 31 October.

Under that act, Mr Johnson had until 23:00 BST on Saturday to send a letter requesting a delay to the UK's departure - something he did, albeit without his signature.

Boris Johnson's Brexit deal

ANALYSIS: Chances of agreement still strong, says Laura Kuenssberg

IN BRIEF: What happened on Saturday?

EXPLAINED: How another delay would work

IN GRAPHICS: What happens now?

How has the government reacted?

Mr Raab told the BBC's Andrew Marr show that "notwithstanding the parliamentary shenanigans, we appear to have now the numbers to get this through".

He said there were "many people in the EU" who were "deeply uncomfortable" about a further delay to Brexit and urged MPs to "get on, get it through the House of Commons, and move on."

His colleague, Michael Gove, chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, accused those who backed the Letwin amendment of voting "explicitly to try to frustrate this process and to drag it out".

He told Sky News' Sophy Ridge on Sunday "we have a deal that allows us to leave" on 31 October, but the government would now trigger Operation Yellowhammer - its contingency plan to handle a no-deal Brexit - because there was no guarantee the EU would grant an extension.

The government is set to ask for a further meaningful vote on Monday, presenting MPs with a binary choice to approve or oppose the deal in principle.

However, it will be up to Commons Speaker John Bercow to decide whether to allow that vote.

BBC Deputy Political Editor John Pienaar says the thinking at Westminster is that Mr Bercow will not permit a re-run of the vote.

He says to "expect a good row about that", adding that the Speaker has been clear in the past that he sees no reason to repeat a debate "just because the loser doesn't like losing".

What is Labour saying?

Labour had planned to vote against Boris Johnson's deal - although a few rebels would likely have backed it - arguing it would be bad for the economy, jobs, workers' rights and other areas like the environment.

Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer accused the prime minister of "being childlike" by sending a second letter to the EU contradicting the first stipulated by the Benn Act.

He told Andrew Marr his party would seek to amend the deal when the WAB is brought to Parliament, for example by demanding a UK-wide customs union with the EU and single market alignment.

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He said Labour would look for ways to avoid "a trapdoor to no-deal at the end of 2020" - some critics of Mr Johnson's agreement fear there are no provisions to prevent a no-deal exit at the end of the transition period if no free trade agreement has been reached with the EU.

Sir Keir also said his party would support an amendment requiring the deal to be put to another referendum.

He said he believed that would most likely be tabled by a backbencher, but insisted: "It's got to go back to the public."

Organising another public vote would take a minimum of 22 weeks, according to experts at the Constitution Unit at University College London (UCL), and Sir Keir accepted that sort of timescale was reasonable.

A government also cannot just decide to hold a referendum. Instead, a majority of MPs and Lords would need to agree and vote through the rules, and there would likely be deep divisions over the wording of the question, the number of options on the ballot paper and the voting system.

Lucy Powell, Labour MP for Manchester Central, told Sky News "those advocating a second referendum know the numbers aren't there". The PM's deal was "now likely to pass", she continued, adding that next few days and weeks "are our final chance to shape Brexit".

What about the EU?

EU Council President Donald Tusk has acknowledged receipt of the UK's extension request and said he would consult EU leaders "on how to react".

Ambassadors from the 27 EU nations met for about 15 minutes in Brussels on Sunday morning and continued the legal process of ratifying the Brexit deal on the EU side.

The EU's Chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, told diplomats the passage of the Letwin amendment did not mean that the deal had been rejected.

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Mr Letwin himself told the BBC's Andrew Marr on Sunday his amendment was "an insurance policy" and now it had passed, he would give his full support to the prime minister's deal.

All 27 EU nations must agree to any extension to Brexit, and French President Emmanuel Macron has already signalled he believed a new Brexit extension was not good for anyone.

However, BBC Europe editor Katya Adler said if the alternative was a no-deal Brexit, the EU was unlikely to refuse - although it would want to know what any extension was for - a general election, another referendum, or merely a bit more time needed to pass Brexit-related legislation?

Could this all end up in court?

Just weeks after the Supreme Court ruled Mr Johnson's prorogation of Parliament was unlawful, some suggest his attempts to undermine the Benn Act with a second letter could see him back there again.

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell suggested the PM could be "in contempt of Parliament or the courts". That was echoed by SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford, although he refused to be drawn on any court action this week.

Scotland highest court, the Court of Session, is due to meet on Monday to consider the matter. It was asked earlier this month to sign a letter fulfilling the terms of the Benn Act on the prime minister's behalf if he failed to do so, but judges delayed giving a ruling to allow the political debate to play out.

The SNP's Joanna Cherry pointed out that the government gave an undertaking to the court not to frustrate the act, but she said "now arguably that is what he has done".

The government insists it has complied with the requirements of the Benn Act.

What is the Withdrawal Agreement Bill?

The UK needs to pass a law to implement the withdrawal agreement - the part of the PM's Brexit deal which will take the country out of the EU - in UK law.

It has to secure the backing of a majority of MPs and peers, and a vote for the Brexit deal itself is no guarantee of a vote for the legislation required to implement it.

The bill gives legal effect to any agreed transition period and fulfils requirements on the rights of EU citizens in the UK after Brexit. It will also allow ministers to make "divorce payments" to the EU foreseen under the current deal.

MPs will be able to vote on amendments - changes or add-ons - to the bill, for instance stipulating Parliament's role in the future relationship negotiation, or for the deal to be put to a referendum.

If the government cannot get the WAB through Parliament the default legal position is that the UK cannot ratify the deal, and so would leave on 31 October without a deal. However, that is dependent on no extension beyond that date having been already agreed with the EU.

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Media playback is unsupported on your device

The government says it will push ahead with efforts to pass its Brexit deal, despite a major setback to its plans.

Boris Johnson had to ask the EU for an extension to the UK's 31 October exit date after MPs backed a move to delay approval of the deal on Saturday.

But Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said he was confident enough MPs would back the deal next week, and Brexit would still happen by the deadline.

Labour, however, has said it will back moves to put the deal to a referendum.

No 10 said the PM sent "Parliament's letter" to Brussels - unsigned - and accompanied it with a second letter - which was signed - explaining why he believed a delay would be a mistake.

The government has vowed to press ahead with the legislation - the Withdrawal Agreement Bill (WAB) - to implement the Brexit deal next week.

Why has the PM asked for another extension?

Having reached a new Brexit deal with the EU last week, the prime minster had intended to bring it to Parliament and ask MPs to approve it in a so-called "meaningful vote".

However, in the first Saturday sitting in the Commons for 37 years, MPs instead voted in favour of an amendment withholding approval of the deal until all the necessary legislation to implement it had been passed.

Tabled by Tory MP Sir Oliver Letwin, the amendment was intended to ensure that Mr Johnson would comply with the terms of the so-called Benn Act designed to eliminate any possibility of a no-deal exit on 31 October.

Under that act, Mr Johnson had until 23:00 BST on Saturday to send a letter requesting a delay to the UK's departure - something he did, albeit without his signature.

Boris Johnson's Brexit deal

ANALYSIS: Chances of agreement still strong, says Laura Kuenssberg

IN BRIEF: What happened on Saturday?

EXPLAINED: How another delay would work

IN GRAPHICS: What happens now?

How has the government reacted?

Mr Raab told the BBC's Andrew Marr show that "notwithstanding the parliamentary shenanigans, we appear to have now the numbers to get this through".

He said there were "many people in the EU" who were "deeply uncomfortable" about a further delay to Brexit and urged MPs to "get on, get it through the House of Commons, and move on."

His colleague, Michael Gove, chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, accused those who backed the Letwin amendment of voting "explicitly to try to frustrate this process and to drag it out".

He told Sky News' Sophy Ridge on Sunday "we have a deal that allows us to leave" on 31 October, but the government would now trigger Operation Yellowhammer - its contingency plan to handle a no-deal Brexit - because there was no guarantee the EU would grant an extension.

The government is set to ask for a further meaningful vote on Monday, presenting MPs with a binary choice to approve or oppose the deal in principle.

However, it will be up to Commons Speaker John Bercow to decide whether to allow that vote.

BBC Deputy Political Editor John Pienaar says the thinking at Westminster is that Mr Bercow will not permit a re-run of the vote.

He says to "expect a good row about that", adding that the Speaker has been clear in the past that he sees no reason to repeat a debate "just because the loser doesn't like losing".

What is Labour saying?

Labour had planned to vote against Boris Johnson's deal - although a few rebels would likely have backed it - arguing it would be bad for the economy, jobs, workers' rights and other areas like the environment.

Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer accused the prime minister of "being childlike" by sending a second letter to the EU contradicting the first stipulated by the Benn Act.

He told Andrew Marr his party would seek to amend the deal when the WAB is brought to Parliament, for example by demanding a UK-wide customs union with the EU and single market alignment.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

He said Labour would look for ways to avoid "a trapdoor to no-deal at the end of 2020" - some critics of Mr Johnson's agreement fear there are no provisions to prevent a no-deal exit at the end of the transition period if no free trade agreement has been reached with the EU.

Sir Keir also said his party would support an amendment requiring the deal to be put to another referendum.

He said he believed that would most likely be tabled by a backbencher, but insisted: "It's got to go back to the public."

Organising another public vote would take a minimum of 22 weeks, according to experts at the Constitution Unit at University College London (UCL), and Sir Keir accepted that sort of timescale was reasonable.

A government also cannot just decide to hold a referendum. Instead, a majority of MPs and Lords would need to agree and vote through the rules, and there would likely be deep divisions over the wording of the question, the number of options on the ballot paper and the voting system.

Lucy Powell, Labour MP for Manchester Central, told Sky News "those advocating a second referendum know the numbers aren't there". The PM's deal was "now likely to pass", she continued, adding that next few days and weeks "are our final chance to shape Brexit".

What about the EU?

EU Council President Donald Tusk has acknowledged receipt of the UK's extension request and said he would consult EU leaders "on how to react".

Ambassadors from the 27 EU nations met for about 15 minutes in Brussels on Sunday morning and continued the legal process of ratifying the Brexit deal on the EU side.

The EU's Chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, told diplomats the passage of the Letwin amendment did not mean that the deal had been rejected.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Mr Letwin himself told the BBC's Andrew Marr on Sunday his amendment was "an insurance policy" and now it had passed, he would give his full support to the prime minister's deal.

All 27 EU nations must agree to any extension to Brexit, and French President Emmanuel Macron has already signalled he believed a new Brexit extension was not good for anyone.

However, BBC Europe editor Katya Adler said if the alternative was a no-deal Brexit, the EU was unlikely to refuse - although it would want to know what any extension was for - a general election, another referendum, or merely a bit more time needed to pass Brexit-related legislation?

Could this all end up in court?

Just weeks after the Supreme Court ruled Mr Johnson's prorogation of Parliament was unlawful, some suggest his attempts to undermine the Benn Act with a second letter could see him back there again.

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell suggested the PM could be "in contempt of Parliament or the courts". That was echoed by SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford, although he refused to be drawn on any court action this week.

Scotland highest court, the Court of Session, is due to meet on Monday to consider the matter. It was asked earlier this month to sign a letter fulfilling the terms of the Benn Act on the prime minister's behalf if he failed to do so, but judges delayed giving a ruling to allow the political debate to play out.

The SNP's Joanna Cherry pointed out that the government gave an undertaking to the court not to frustrate the act, but she said "now arguably that is what he has done".

The government insists it has complied with the requirements of the Benn Act.

What is the Withdrawal Agreement Bill?

The UK needs to pass a law to implement the withdrawal agreement - the part of the PM's Brexit deal which will take the country out of the EU - in UK law.

It has to secure the backing of a majority of MPs and peers, and a vote for the Brexit deal itself is no guarantee of a vote for the legislation required to implement it.

The bill gives legal effect to any agreed transition period and fulfils requirements on the rights of EU citizens in the UK after Brexit. It will also allow ministers to make "divorce payments" to the EU foreseen under the current deal.

MPs will be able to vote on amendments - changes or add-ons - to the bill, for instance stipulating Parliament's role in the future relationship negotiation, or for the deal to be put to a referendum.

If the government cannot get the WAB through Parliament the default legal position is that the UK cannot ratify the deal, and so would leave on 31 October without a deal. However, that is dependent on no extension beyond that date having been already agreed with the EU.

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Brexit: Johnson 'has the numbers' in Commons to pass deal, says Raab

Array ( [post_title] => Brexit: Johnson 'has the numbers' in Commons to pass deal, says Raab [post_content] =>

Media playback is unsupported on your device

The government says it will push ahead with efforts to pass its Brexit deal, despite a major setback to its plans.

Boris Johnson had to ask the EU for an extension to the UK's 31 October exit date after MPs backed a move to delay approval of the deal on Saturday.

But Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said he was confident enough MPs would back the deal next week, and Brexit would still happen by the deadline.

Labour, however, has said it will back moves to put the deal to a referendum.

No 10 said the PM sent "Parliament's letter" to Brussels - unsigned - and accompanied it with a second letter - which was signed - explaining why he believed a delay would be a mistake.

The government has vowed to press ahead with the legislation - the Withdrawal Agreement Bill (WAB) - to implement the Brexit deal next week.

Why has the PM asked for another extension?

Having reached a new Brexit deal with the EU last week, the prime minster had intended to bring it to Parliament and ask MPs to approve it in a so-called "meaningful vote".

However, in the first Saturday sitting in the Commons for 37 years, MPs instead voted in favour of an amendment withholding approval of the deal until all the necessary legislation to implement it had been passed.

Tabled by Tory MP Sir Oliver Letwin, the amendment was intended to ensure that Mr Johnson would comply with the terms of the so-called Benn Act designed to eliminate any possibility of a no-deal exit on 31 October.

Under that act, Mr Johnson had until 23:00 BST on Saturday to send a letter requesting a delay to the UK's departure - something he did, albeit without his signature.

Boris Johnson's Brexit deal

ANALYSIS: Chances of agreement still strong, says Laura Kuenssberg

IN BRIEF: What happened on Saturday?

EXPLAINED: How another delay would work

IN GRAPHICS: What happens now?

How has the government reacted?

Mr Raab told the BBC's Andrew Marr show that "notwithstanding the parliamentary shenanigans, we appear to have now the numbers to get this through".

He said there were "many people in the EU" who were "deeply uncomfortable" about a further delay to Brexit and urged MPs to "get on, get it through the House of Commons, and move on."

His colleague, Michael Gove, chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, accused those who backed the Letwin amendment of voting "explicitly to try to frustrate this process and to drag it out".

He told Sky News' Sophy Ridge on Sunday "we have a deal that allows us to leave" on 31 October, but the government would now trigger Operation Yellowhammer - its contingency plan to handle a no-deal Brexit - because there was no guarantee the EU would grant an extension.

The government is set to ask for a further meaningful vote on Monday, presenting MPs with a binary choice to approve or oppose the deal in principle.

However, it will be up to Commons Speaker John Bercow to decide whether to allow that vote.

BBC Deputy Political Editor John Pienaar says the thinking at Westminster is that Mr Bercow will not permit a re-run of the vote.

He says to "expect a good row about that", adding that the Speaker has been clear in the past that he sees no reason to repeat a debate "just because the loser doesn't like losing".

What is Labour saying?

Labour had planned to vote against Boris Johnson's deal - although a few rebels would likely have backed it - arguing it would be bad for the economy, jobs, workers' rights and other areas like the environment.

Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer accused the prime minister of "being childlike" by sending a second letter to the EU contradicting the first stipulated by the Benn Act.

He told Andrew Marr his party would seek to amend the deal when the WAB is brought to Parliament, for example by demanding a UK-wide customs union with the EU and single market alignment.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

He said Labour would look for ways to avoid "a trapdoor to no-deal at the end of 2020" - some critics of Mr Johnson's agreement fear there are no provisions to prevent a no-deal exit at the end of the transition period if no free trade agreement has been reached with the EU.

Sir Keir also said his party would support an amendment requiring the deal to be put to another referendum.

He said he believed that would most likely be tabled by a backbencher, but insisted: "It's got to go back to the public."

Organising another public vote would take a minimum of 22 weeks, according to experts at the Constitution Unit at University College London (UCL), and Sir Keir accepted that sort of timescale was reasonable.

A government also cannot just decide to hold a referendum. Instead, a majority of MPs and Lords would need to agree and vote through the rules, and there would likely be deep divisions over the wording of the question, the number of options on the ballot paper and the voting system.

Lucy Powell, Labour MP for Manchester Central, told Sky News "those advocating a second referendum know the numbers aren't there". The PM's deal was "now likely to pass", she continued, adding that next few days and weeks "are our final chance to shape Brexit".

What about the EU?

EU Council President Donald Tusk has acknowledged receipt of the UK's extension request and said he would consult EU leaders "on how to react".

Ambassadors from the 27 EU nations met for about 15 minutes in Brussels on Sunday morning and continued the legal process of ratifying the Brexit deal on the EU side.

The EU's Chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, told diplomats the passage of the Letwin amendment did not mean that the deal had been rejected.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Mr Letwin himself told the BBC's Andrew Marr on Sunday his amendment was "an insurance policy" and now it had passed, he would give his full support to the prime minister's deal.

All 27 EU nations must agree to any extension to Brexit, and French President Emmanuel Macron has already signalled he believed a new Brexit extension was not good for anyone.

However, BBC Europe editor Katya Adler said if the alternative was a no-deal Brexit, the EU was unlikely to refuse - although it would want to know what any extension was for - a general election, another referendum, or merely a bit more time needed to pass Brexit-related legislation?

Could this all end up in court?

Just weeks after the Supreme Court ruled Mr Johnson's prorogation of Parliament was unlawful, some suggest his attempts to undermine the Benn Act with a second letter could see him back there again.

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell suggested the PM could be "in contempt of Parliament or the courts". That was echoed by SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford, although he refused to be drawn on any court action this week.

Scotland highest court, the Court of Session, is due to meet on Monday to consider the matter. It was asked earlier this month to sign a letter fulfilling the terms of the Benn Act on the prime minister's behalf if he failed to do so, but judges delayed giving a ruling to allow the political debate to play out.

The SNP's Joanna Cherry pointed out that the government gave an undertaking to the court not to frustrate the act, but she said "now arguably that is what he has done".

The government insists it has complied with the requirements of the Benn Act.

What is the Withdrawal Agreement Bill?

The UK needs to pass a law to implement the withdrawal agreement - the part of the PM's Brexit deal which will take the country out of the EU - in UK law.

It has to secure the backing of a majority of MPs and peers, and a vote for the Brexit deal itself is no guarantee of a vote for the legislation required to implement it.

The bill gives legal effect to any agreed transition period and fulfils requirements on the rights of EU citizens in the UK after Brexit. It will also allow ministers to make "divorce payments" to the EU foreseen under the current deal.

MPs will be able to vote on amendments - changes or add-ons - to the bill, for instance stipulating Parliament's role in the future relationship negotiation, or for the deal to be put to a referendum.

If the government cannot get the WAB through Parliament the default legal position is that the UK cannot ratify the deal, and so would leave on 31 October without a deal. However, that is dependent on no extension beyond that date having been already agreed with the EU.

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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Milton Keynes stabbings: Two teenagers killed at house party

Array ( [post_title] => Milton Keynes stabbings: Two teenagers killed at house party [post_content] =>

Two 17-year-old boys have been stabbed to death at a house party.

Police and paramedics were called to a house in Archford Croft in Milton Keynes at about midnight on Saturday.

The teenagers have been named locally as Dom Ansah and Ben Gillham-Rice, as relatives said their "hearts are broken".

One of the boys died at the scene and the other in hospital. Thames Valley Police said no arrests had been made in the double murder inquiry.

A 17-year-old boy and a 23-year-old man were also hurt and were taken to hospital with serious but not life-threatening injuries, the force said.

Det Ch Supt Ian Hunter said the stabbings happened "at a private house party" and those involved in the violence "are all likely to have known each other".

He said police believed the victims had been invited to the party, which was attended by 15 to 20 people.

Officers are expected to remain at the scene, which is on a cul-de-sac in a housing estate in the Emerson Valley area, for several days.

Stains of what appeared to be blood could be seen on the front door of a house inside the police cordon.

Two of Dom Ansah's cousins laid flowers at the cordon on Sunday afternoon.

"He's come here with his long-time best friend since childhood, comes to a party and both of their lives just got ripped away from them," said one, who did not give her name.

"He was just so respectful to like his family and friends. Many, many people's hearts are broken."

Neighbour Suzzy Teye said she believed the gathering was a party for a teenage girl living in the house, while others said a birthday banner had been hanging at the door earlier in the evening.

Mrs Teye saw p